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    • New! From The Post-Apollo Press – Anne Waldman’s JAGUAR HARMONICS: Person Woven of Tesserae

      We are so pleased to announce the publication of Anne Waldman's JAGUAR HARMONICS: Person Woven of Tesserae, a deftly rendered telling of Waldman's own journeys to, from and between our world and the next door world the of the Ayahuasca, with over art and interior drawings of our constant companion throughout the text, the jaguar, by the always incredible Etel Adnan. "In Anne Waldman's JAGUAR HARMONICS, the voice of the Ayahuasca vine, a 'person woven of sound' speaks to the poet and us: 'now you are quick, soon you will be dead'; 'you can't just go around killing and conquering persons'. And the poet asks herself, can we hear the 'mammal stealth' of these warnings? 'The suffering on this land, what done to the indigenes?' 'Men miss out in the mission in the fission if not listening.' Her listening creates a tesserae of sounds and languages for 'poetry (to) blink you awake.' A masterful web that compels us to 'put away the scriptures of doom' and 'breathe in this world this time of cosmic night." ---Cecilia Vicuña Order your own copy from our distributor, Small Press Distribution, or directly from us by emailing postapollo@earthlink.net
    • NEW! From The Post-Apollo Press : Mum is Down by Oscarine Bosquet, translated by Simone Fattal & Cole Swensen

      We're so pleased to announce the newest member of our Contemporary Poetry Series #1 (aka "The Small Series"), Mum is Down by Oscarine Bosquet, translated from the French by Cole Swensen & our very own publisher, Simone Fattal! This book carries an incredible weight despite its diminutive size. And the ground remains ground remains ground hard closed How long does it take a body to hit the ground when it falls from I have no idea what height? "Mum is Down is at once a harrowing work and, by the sheer integrity of its agonistic confrontation with the unthinkable, a profoundly redemptive one." -- Michael Palmer Mum is Down is available for purchase through our distributor, Small Press Distribution here. Oscarine Bosquet was born in 1964 in Paris. She is the author of four volumes of poetry in French and has published extensively in magazines and anthologies. She teaches at the Ecole Supérior des Arts in Brest. Her book, Present Participle, also in English, was recently published by La Presse. A native of the San Francisco Bay Area, Cole Swensen is a poet and translator of French poetry, prose, and art critcism. She co-edited the Norton anthology American Hybrid and is the founding editor of the small press La Presse. She divides her life between Providence, RI and Paris. Simone Fattal is a painter, sculpter and translator. She is the publisher of The Post-Apollo Press.
    • Anne Waldman on Her Book JAGUAR HARMONICS : Person Woven of Tesserae

      Check out this gorgeous new video featuring an interview with Anne Waldman by filmmakers Alystyre Julian and Mariana Luna  (New York City, 15 January, 2014) about her new book, JAGUAR HARMONICS : Person Woven of Tesserae, forthcoming from The Post-Apollo Press this spring! http://vimeo.com/86349010 See video for further credits. You can support the making of a new documentary about Anne Waldman, "OUTRIDER"  directed by Alystyre Julian by donating to the filmmaker's indiegogo campaign here.      
    • Two New Titles Coming Soon!

      The Post-Apollo Press is pleased to announce that we will be releasing two new titles early this year (2014), including a new translation by contemporary French poet, Oscarine Bosquet, and Anne Waldman's long poem inspired by the Ayahuasca vine. Here's a taste of what's to come!  Mum is Down by Oscarine Bosquet, translated by Simone Fattal & Cole Swensen The memory of the fall your fall which drags me along this decisive movement after which we watch the remains 288 bones. In French the bones beneath the eyes are called pommettes they are the little pommes of the squelette. * You can read excerpts of the original French here In a letter written to Oscarine Bosquet upon Mum is Down's French publication, Liliane Giraudon wrote about the book: "Dear Oscarine, I have for the third time reopened your book and found myself in tears and I want to tell you how much this poem is magnificent and that my tears are not simply due to an emotionalism one should dismiss. This gift of tears is the perfect sign for letting us know that the poem goes way beyond its subject. The poem/object is for each person a key, an opener as much as it is a personal enigma. Your book is not only a sublime eulogy---with its strawberries and artichokes, but the treatment of terrible subjects that are embedded into every maternal lineage. The overwhelming cruelty of the siren cut with scissors as well as the condemnation to the dwarves…
    • The Ridiculous Beauty of One of Habib Tengour’s ‘Crossings’

      Review by M. Lynx Qualey on Arab Literature (in English) : CROSSINGS (by Habib Tengour, translated by Marilyn Hacker) Recently, I've been reading my way around and through Algerian poet Habib Tengour's Crossings, trans. Marilyn Hacker, Post-Apollo Press. I was particularly charmed by the final poem:Crossings, in a flawlessly tuned translation by Hacker (2013), "distinguishes poetry from prose." At least, the protagonist of Tengour's brilliant "This Particular Tartar" can distinguish between the two, we're told. They intertwine here, as in all but the first of Crossings' four long poems. "This Particular Tartar," the last of the collection's five poems, is a wild amalgam: poem, story, satire, fantasy, quasi-sociological, quasi-reportorial, quasi-historical document. The "Tartar" evokes rich imagery in Arab oral and written histories: The Tartars were the horde of "barbarians," led by Hulagu Khan, who laid siege to thirteenth-century Baghdad. The "Tartars" are portrayed in numerous Arabic stories and poems, including Jurji Zaydan's popular The Caliph's Heirs. But here: This particular Tartar is waiting beside a side-road. He's been squatting and moping there for a while. He would rather wait there than beside the highway with cars rushing by at full speed. They splatter you with mud without a thought. There are even drivers --- the bastards --- who turn around to laugh in your face. It is an ignominious position for one who used to strike such terror into people's hearts; indeed, the poem's narrator tells us, once upon a time the Tartars inspired such fears that "there would be gigantic traffic…